Ethics- The Critical Question

“Our lives today demand that we face and respond to ethical dilemmas, agree or disagree?”

I personally agree that due to the broad spectrum of ethical dilemmas present in our daily lives, it is necessary that we show awareness try to make the right choices. By choosing something that may negatively affect another when there’s a better option can affect society in general. Therefore I think our lives today demand that we must face and respond to these dilemmas.

To begin with, a valid and ongoing example of an ethical dilemma is youth homelessness. It is a general response, that when you see a homeless personyou will guide your focus elsewhere, simply look away, or suddenly show particular interest in the concrete beneath your feet. After the Youth Homelessness trail, I no longer find myself politely away; instead I choose to remind myself how fortunate I am and how this ethical issue is one that needs to be brought to our immediate attention.

Once someone becomes homeless, our guide Belinda explained, it is incredibly difficult for them to regain a home and job. How are jobless, homeless people expected to be able to pay rent and receive income? I believe this dilemma should no longer be ignored; the homeless are the same as us- the only difference is that they have been deprived of a place they can call home. Those who lack respect for these people should understand that becoming homeless is not always a choice. I find it inhumane to ignore others who are simply less fortunate than us, to disrespect them. Issues at home may have given them no other option but to leave, therefore leaving them homeless. To support this idea of critical opinions, a client from the Hanover Client Survey (2008) said:

“Having to tell people, ‘I am homeless’ is embarrassing as it makes me feel like I’m some lazy bum with a drug and alcohol problem who doesn’t do anything to help themselves. I overhear people talking and this seems to be a common opinion”

However, youth homelessness is a large and extreme example of an ethical dilemma. Of course, there are many smaller and daily issues we face in our lives. For example, take the five dollar note the person in front of you dropped while walking down the street. Take it or return it? A simple ethical dilemma. Should you take the money for yourself, for many people including ( myself), the act would constantly make me feel guilty about my act. Therefore, the general response would be to give the money back.

Overall, for the reasons mentioned above, I still believe it is demanded that we face ethical dilemmas and must respond to them as a part of our everyday life.

Bibliography:

http://hanover.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/Public_Perceptions_and_Attitudes_to_Homelessness.pdf

http://www.hanover.org.au/public-perceptions-of-homelessness/

http://www.ahomewithhope.org/media/31043/tarrant-county-ethics-training.pdf

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20091112112411AATyEcI

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One response to “Ethics- The Critical Question

  1. Hi Connie
    You have written a cohesive response. I enjoy hearing about your experience with homelessness. Are there any other ethical dilemmas that you experience in your daily routine? Maybe something as simple as whether to give up your seat on the train to an elderly person. Where your food/clothes/products come from? Choosing to swipe your Myki or not? I did appreciate your use of the five dollar note being dropped that was good. But even more regular daily ethical dilemmas would be good.

    Coherence of argument: level 1 of 2
    Use of evidence: level 1 of 2
    Further Research: level 1 of 1
    Multiple Perspectives: level 1 of 2
    Critical Thinking: level 0 of 1
    Expression & language use: 1 level of 1

    bye
    jane 🙂

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